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Honors Program Course Descriptions

Fall 2022 Honors Courses

Political Science (POL SCI) 204 International Relations (IAI#: S5 904) M/W 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Meetings on campus

Prof. Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu​

Use this 5-digit code to register for POL SCI 204-EHN6: 32345

[General Education/Social Science Requirement]

The world is interconnected in ways that will impact our lives. Since 2020, there has been the Covid pandemic. Beginning in 2016, the world has been dealing with a pandemic of misinformation on social media, crossing borders and stoking anger within countries. Terrorism, the warming of the planet, drug smuggling, human trafficking, civil wars, and, of course, traditional wars like that between Russia and Ukraine will affect us—whether it is through a refugee crisis or higher prices at the grocery store.
In this course we will examine these issues and who decides what happens. Countries exist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers usually get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course as well. We will consider the various international relations theories, trade, cyber security, geopolitics and diplomacy. Since international relations often deal with life and death issues, we will consider whether moral questions should be used in decision making on the international level, and, if so, what the truly moral response is.
This honors class will include a diplomacy simulation, a guest speaker, and a service project.

English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900) Tues/Thurs 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert: vbruckert@ccc.edu 773-481-8333

Use this 5-digit code to register for English 101-HON: 32794

[General ed. Communications requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers to discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book. These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Brightspace and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.

Literature 115 Honors: Introduction to Great Books of the World (IAI: H3 907) Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 am

Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu, 773-481-8583

Use this 5-digit code to register for LIT 115-HON9: 32803

[Great Books/ General Education/Humanities requirement]

In this course, students will encounter some of the memorable tricksters and fools of British Literature, both the good and the evil, the contemptuous and the hilarious. We will meet the clever, foul-mouth Miller, the feminist prototype Wife of Bath and the immoral, blatantly sinful Pardoner (Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales); encounter several of Shakespeare’s playful, deceitful, and foolish characters from A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Othello; and much more. This course will help to enrich your skills as a student, notably in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through weekly research of literary works and relevant topics, you will also use close reading of primary texts to participate in stimulating round-table discussions and presentations


SPRING 2022 HONORS COURSES


Political Science (POL SCI) 204 International Relations (IAI#: S5 904) M/W 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

Prof. Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu, 773-481-8336

Use this 5-digit code to register for POL SCI 204-HON: 62453

[General Education/Social Science Requirement]

Countries exist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. Whether the future holds war, closed borders, huge refugee migrations, environmental degradation or another pandemic, is a matter of decision making done on a global scale. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering, among others, game theory, geopolitics, cyber security, and trade.


In this honors course, students will work on an undergraduate research project with the U.S. Dept. of State as part of Diplomacy Lab. We will work under the guidance of the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines, examining the issue of misinformation on social media in that country. We will consider several fake news case studies, what has been done to combat them, and what the U.S. or international bodies such as the United Nations can do to combat this threat to democracies around the world.


FALL 2021 HONORS COURSES


English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900) Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert: vbruckert@ccc.edu, 773-481-8336

Use this 5-digit code to register for English 101-Honors: 33128

[General Education/Communications requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers to discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book. These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Brightspace and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.


Literature 115 Introduction to Great Books of the World (IAI # H3 90​7) Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m. Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu, 773-481-8583

Use this 5-digit code to register for LIT 115-HON9: 33150

[Great Books/ General Education/Humanities requirement]

This course is an honors introduction to the Great Books. Students in the course will examine literature from multiple perspectives, allowing students to more deeply investigate social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts through critical investigations of the literature. The integration and discussion of these various contexts will allow students to understand the course in the broader perspectives of various disciplines in the arts and sciences. Students will be required to perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for participating in weekly student presentations, student teaching, and shared inquiry, round-table discussions. Also, each week students will be required to research literary works and topics and to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a minimum of twenty pages of research-based argument, including a single, 2500 to 3000-word research paper. All students are required to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought.


SPRING 2021 HONORS COURSES


English 102SA Composition II Topic: Virtual​ Reality, Augmented Reality, and Atmospheric Media

(IAI #: C1 901 R) Saturday 8:30 a.m.-11:20 a.m.

Prof. Mark Brand: mbrand3@ccc.edu

[General Education/Communications requirement] 

In this class, we will explore stories and scholarship about cutting-edge media forms: virtual reality, augmented reality, and atmospheric media. We will begin with stories from the cyberpunk era that longed for immersion in—or perhaps escape to—imaginary spaces (virtual reality) and the isolated yet-hyper-connected world that these authors both promised and cautioned against. We will examine our contemporary preoccupation with artificial objects and companions that join us in our real physical spaces (augmented reality), and lastly we will look at our seemingly-endless fascination with telepresences both human and artificial, and their mediation through increasingly invisible technologies (so-called “atmospheric” media) that suffuse our everyday lives. This class will be grounded in the use of research to articulate our findings in the form of conventional thesis-driven research papers as well as digital projects of our own.


Literature 211 HON9 Shakespeare (IAI#: ​H3 905) Tue/Thurs 9:30 a.m.-10:50 a.m.

Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books/General Education/Humanities requirement]


During this time of crisis, students in Honors Shakespeare will trace how personal, social and political crises are often necessary for progress. Through examination of the texts, as well as film adaptations, students will pair tragedies with comedies written around the same time: Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream (c. 1595), Hamlet and Twelfth Night (c. 1600), and Othello and Measure for Measure (c. 1604). By examining the similarities and differences in the genres of tragedy and comedy, we will consider how these plays complement each other in their approach to personal, social, and political conflict and resolution. Also, students in the course will examine literature from multiple perspectives, allowing students to more deeply investigate social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts through critical investigations of the literature. The integration and discussion of these various contexts will allow students to understand the course in the broader perspectives of various disciplines in the arts and sciences. Students will be required to perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for participating in weekly student presentations, student teaching, and shared inquiry, round-table discussions. Also, each week students will be required to research literary works and topics and to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a minimum of twenty pages of research-based argument, including a single, 2500 to 3000-word research paper. All students are required to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought.


Political Science (POL SCI) 204 International Relations (IAI#: S5 904) Mon/Wed 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. 

Prof. Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu

[General Education/Social Science requirement] 

Countriesexist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. Whether the future holds war, closed borders, huge refugee migrations, environmental degradation or pandemics, is a matter of decision making done on a global scale. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering, among others, game theory, geopolitics, environmental politics and trade. In this honors course, students will have the chance to visit with a foreign consulate in the city and hear directly from their nationals. Students will also work together with talented peers to develop a body of research on a region or issue that will form the basis for a professional quality undergraduate thesis paper.


ARCHIVED - FALL2020HONORS COURSES

English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900)Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert:vbruckert@ccc.edu, 773-481-8336

[General Education/Communications requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers to discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing.The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book.These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Brightspace and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.


Literature 118 Great Books Seminar: Tricksters and Fools of British Literature

(IAI # H3 907)Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu, 773-481-8583

[Great Books/General Education/Humanities requirement]

In this honors literature course, students will encounter some of the memorable tricksters and fools of British Literature, both the good and the evil, the contemptuous and the hilarious. We will meet the clever, foul-mouth Miller, the feminist prototype Wife of Bath and the immoral, blatantly sinful Pardoner (Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales); encounter several of Shakespeare’s playful, deceitful, and foolish characters from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, and Othello; marvel at the smooth-talking lovers in the poetry of John Donne and his contemporaries; smile at the foolish vanity of Jonathon Swift’s characters (Gulliver’s Travels); and much more. This course will help to enrich your skills as a student, notably in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through weekly research of literary works and relevant topics, you will also use close reading of primary texts to participate in stimulating round-table discussions and presentations.


ARCHIVED-SPRING 2020HONORS COURSES


Literature 115 Introduction to Great Books of the World (IAI # H3 907) Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m. Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu, 773-481-8583

[Great Books/ General Education/Humanities requirement]

In this course we will study the tradition of the revenge tragedy in literature. The genre (act of murder leads to act of retribution and death) can be traced back at least to Roman playwright Seneca (Thyestes), and it continues to popular literature and movies today. We will read William Shakespeare’sHamlet,Thomas Kyd’sThe Spanish Tragedy,Thomas Middleton’sThe Revenger’s Tragedyand John Webster'sThe Duchess of Malfi. Students in the course will examine this literature from multiple perspectives, deeply investigating social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts through critical investigations of the literature. Students will be required to perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for weekly student presentations, student teaching, and shared inquiry, round-table discussions.In addition, each week students will be required to research literary works and topics and to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a minimum of twenty pages of research-based argument, including a single, 2500 to 3000-word research paper. All students are required to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought.This course counts toward both an Honors certificate and a Great Books certificate.

Political Science (POL SCI) 204 International Relations (IAI#: S5 904) Mon/Wed 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Prof. Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu, 773-481-8466

[General Education/Social Science Requirement]

Countriesexist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. Whether the future holds war, closed borders, huge refugee migrations, environmental degradation or pandemics, is a matter of decision making done on a global scale. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering, among others, game theory, geopolitics, environmental politics and trade. In this honors course, students will have the chance to visit with a foreign consulate in the city and hear directly from their nationals. Students will also work together with talented peers to develop a body of research on a region or issue that will form the basis for a professional quality undergraduate thesis paper.

English 102 Composition II (IAI #: C1 901 R)Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50 p.m.

Prof. Natasha Todorovich: ntodorovich@ccc.edu, 773-481-8190

[Global Studies/General Education/Communications requirement]

This course promotes the core principles of research and advanced scholarship while allowing students to hone argumentative writing skills. The theme for this course is Slavic Literature of the Late 20th Century: Becoming Postmodern. With this in mind, the course examines the topics of identity, existence, and the culture of fate in Slavic literature of the late 20th century, the time of significant geopolitical shifts when the Slavic nations underwent drastic social, political, economic, and ideological transformations. Through intensive reading, writing, analysis, and research, this course will challenge creative and critical thinkers to contextualize ideas and to synthesize literature, history, and philosophy while examining works of some prominent 20th century Czech, Russian, Polish, and Yugoslavian authors.

ARCHIVED - FALL2019 HONORS COURSES

English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900)Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert:vbruckert@ccc.edu

[General Education/Communications requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers to discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book.These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Brightspace and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.

Literature 115 Introduction to Great Books of the World (IAI # H3 907)Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m. Prof. Michael Petersen:mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books/ gen ed. Humanities requirement]

This course is an honors introduction to the Great Books. In this course, students will examine literature from multiple perspectives, allowing them to analyze deeply social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts through critical investigations of the literature. The integration and discussion of these various contexts will allow students to understand the course in the broader perspectives of various disciplines in the arts and sciences. Students will be required to perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for participating in weekly student presentations, student teaching, and shared inquiry, round-table discussions. In addition, each week students will be required to research literary works and topics and to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a minimum of twenty pages of research-based argument, including a single, 2500 to 3000-word research paper. All students are required to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought.

ARCHIVED - SPRING2019HONORS COURSES

English 102 Composition II (IAI #: C1 901 R)Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50 p.m.

Prof. Natasha Todorovich: ntodorovich@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communications requirement]

This course promotes the core principles of research and advanced scholarship while allowing students to hone argumentative writing skills. The focus theme for this course is Slavic Literature of the Late 20th Century: Becoming Postmodern. With this in mind, the course examines the topics of identity, existence, and fate in Slavic literature of the late 20th century, the time of significant geopolitical shifts when the Slavic nations underwent drastic social, political, economic, and ideological transformations. Through intensive reading, writing, analysis, and research, this course will challenge creative and critical thinkers to contextualize ideas and to synthesize literature, history, and philosophy while examining works of some prominent 20th century Czech, Russian, Polish, and Yugoslavian authors.

Literature 113 Introduction to Fiction (IAI # H3 107)Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books/ gen ed. Humanities requirement]

In this honors introduction to fiction course, we will discuss Moral Corruption in literature. Why do good people choose to do bad Some of the works we will read and discuss include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Shakespeare’s Macbeth and others. This course will help to enrich your skills as a student, notably in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through weekly research of literary works and relevant topics, you will also use close reading of primary texts to participate in stimulating round-table discussions and presentations.

Political Science 204 International Relations (IAI #: S5 904N)Mon/Wed 11:00-12:20 p.m. Prof. Merry Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu

[Service Learning course/ General ed. Social Science requirement]

Countries exist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering game theory, geopolitics, environmental politics and trade. In this Honors course, you will have the chance to visit a foreign consulate in the city and hear directly from their nationals. You’ll also work together with talented peers to develop a body of research on a region or issue that will form the basis for a professional quality undergraduate thesis paper. Finally, Prof. Mayer was awarded a Diplomacy Lab project in which you get to assess the impact of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty which will be 50 years old in 2020; the work we produce might be included in activities commemorating the anniversary.

ARCHIVED - FALL2018 HONORS COURSES

Astronomy 201 Descriptive Astronomy I (IAI # P1 906)Tues/Thurs 11:00-12:20 p.m.

Prof. Justin Lowry: jlowry@ccc.edu

[General ed. Science requirement]

“How do we know Earth is round” “Why is the Moon's surface so different from the Earth's” “How can we figure out how far away stars are” In Astronomy 201 Honors, each class period will focus on several questions which we will answer together as a class or in small groups. We will use critical-thinking, basic algebra, and creativity to find our answers. We will investigate our view of the sky, the nature of the planets and stars, and the structure of the universe with great depth and insight. An understanding of basic algebra is highly recommended.

English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900)Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert: vbruckert@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communication requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers to discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book. These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Blackboard and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.

Literature 115 Great Books Seminar: Tricksters and Fools of British Literature

(IAI # H3 907)Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Prof. Michael Petersen: mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books/ gen ed. Humanities requirement]

In this honors literature course, students will encounter some of the memorable tricksters and fools of British Literature. These characters include both the good and the evil, the contemptuous and the hilarious. We will meet the clever, foul-mouth Miller, the feminist prototype Wife of Bath and the immoral, blatantly sinful Pardoner (Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales); encounter several of Shakespeare’s tricksters and fools from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, and Othello; marvel at the smooth-talking lovers in the poetry of John Donne and his contemporaries; smile at the foolish vanity of Jonathon Swift’s characters (Gulliver’s Travels); and much more. This course will help to enrich your skills as a student, notably in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through weekly research of literary works and relevant topics, you will also use close reading of primary texts to participate in stimulating round-table discussions and presentations.

ARCHIVED - SPRING 2018 HONORS COURSES

English 102 Composition II (IAI #: C1 901 R)Tues/Thurs12:30-1:50 p.m.

Prof. Natasha Todorovich:ntodorovich@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communications requirement]

This course promotes the core principles of research and advanced scholarship while allowing students to hone argumentative writing skills. The focus theme for this course is Slavic Literature of the Late 20th Century: Becoming Postmodern. With this in mind, the course examines the topics of identity, existence, and fate in Slavic literature of the late 20th century, the time of significant geopolitical shifts when the Slavic nations underwent drastic social, political, economic, and ideological transformations. Through intensive reading, writing, analysis, and research, this course will challenge creative and critical thinkers to contextualize ideas and to synthesize literature, history, and philosophy while examining works of some prominent 20th century Czech, Russian, Polish, and Yugoslavian authors.

Literature 113 Introduction to Fiction (IAI # H3 107)Tues/Thurs9:30-10:50a.m.

Prof. Michael Petersen:mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books course / General ed. Humanities requirement]

In this honors introduction to fiction course, we will discuss Moral Corruption in literature. Why do good people choose to do bad Some of the works we will read and discuss include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Shakespeare’s Macbeth and others. This course will help to enrich your skills as a student, notably in the areas of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through weekly research of literary works and relevant topics, you will also use close reading of primary texts to participate in stimulating round-table discussions and presentations.

Political Science 204 International Relations (IAI #: S5 904N)Mon/Wed 11:00-12:20 p.m.

Prof. Merry Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu

[Service Learning course / General ed. Social Science requirement]

Countries exist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering game theory, geopolitics, environmental politics and trade. In this Honors course, you will have the chance to visit a foreign consulate in the city and hear directly from their nationals. You’ll also work together with talented peers to develop a body of research on a region or issue that will form the basis for a professional quality undergraduate thesis paper. Finally, Prof. Mayer was awarded a Diplomacy Lab project in which you get to assess the impact of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty which will be 50 years old in 2020; the work we produce might be included in activities commemorating the anniversary.

ARCHIVED - FALL2017 HONORS COURSES

English 101 Composition I (IAI # C1 900)Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert: vbruckert@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communication requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell'sOutliersto discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book. These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Blackboard and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.

Literature 115 Introduction to Great Books of the World(IAI# H3 907) Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:50 a.m. Prof. Michael Petersen:mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books course / General ed. Humanities requirement]

In this course we will study the tradition of the revenge tragedy in literature. The genre (act of murder leads to act of retribution and death) can be traced back at least to Roman playwright Seneca (Thyestes), and it continues to popular literature and movies today. We will read William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, as well as Thyestes, Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy and Thomas Middleton’s The Revenger’s Tragedy. Students in the course will examine this literature from multiple perspectives, deeply and critically investigating social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts. Students will perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for weekly student presentations, student teaching, shared inquiry, and round-table discussions. Students will research literary works and topics to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a long-format research paper. All students are expected to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought. This course counts toward both an Honors certificate and a Great Books certificate.

Speech 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication(IAI# C2 900)Mon/Wed 11:00-12:20p.m. Prof. Susan Colon:scolon20@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communication requirement]

Don’t just sit there. Do something! We face numerous challenges in our local and global communities, such as social and economic inequalities and violations of basic human rights. Informally, we discuss these challenges and sometimes we ¬complain about them. Historically, leaders from diverse backgrounds have turned talk into action by organizing meetings, rallies, strikes, and performances to achieve change and improve their – and our - lives. Thus, in this class we will explore how communication can bring about political, social, and economic change in society. We will analyze the words and behaviors of advocates and activists such as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Angela Davis, Nelson Mandela, Mother Jones, Cesar Chavez, Betty Friedan and Rachel Carson. Along the way we will also explore creative uses of visual presentations.Studying and practicing speech communication concepts and processes will help you not only develop your expressive communication skills but you’ll also begin to comprehend the various ways communication strategies such as persuasion have been used to shape your attitudes and behaviors.

Theater Art 134 Theater Diversity in the U.S.(IAI # F1 909 D)Tues/Thurs11:00-12:20 p.m.

Prof. Maria Jaskot-Inclanminclan@ccc.edu

[Human Diversity/ General ed. Fine Arts course]

This course provides a forum where students develop cultural awareness through theater appreciation and analysis activities. We’ll read the works of contemporary award-winning playwrights who examine themes of multicultural identities in different dramatic genres, including: Lin Manuel Miranda, Suzan-Lori Parks, August Wilson, Quiara Alegria Hudes, Moises Kaufmann, and David Henry Hwang.Through this rich investigation, students address complex ideas that reflect the experience and construction of racial or cultural minority identity in the United States.This course counts toward both an Honors certificate and a Great Books certificate.

ARCHIVED - SPRING 2017 HONORS COURSES

English 102 Composition II(IAI #: C1 901 R)Mon/Wed 12:30-1:50 p.m.

Prof. Natasha Todorovich:ntodorovich@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communications requirement]

This course promotes the core principles of research and advanced scholarship while allowing students to hone argumentative writing skills. The focus theme for this course is Slavic Literature of the Late 20th Century: Becoming Postmodern. With this in mind, the course examines the topics of identity, existence, and fate in Slavic literature of the late 20th century, the time of significant geopolitical shifts when the Slavic nations underwent drastic social, political, economic, and ideological transformations. Through intensive reading, writing, analysis, and research, this course will challenge creative and critical thinkers to contextualize ideas and to synthesize literature, history, and philosophy while examining works of some prominent 20th century Czech, Russian, Polish, and Yugoslavian authors.

Political Science204 International Relations(IAI #: S5 904N)Tues/Thurs 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Prof. Merry Mayer: mmayer2@ccc.edu

[Service Learning course/General ed. Social Science requirement]

Countries exist in a world of few rules, where the bigger powers get to decide outcomes. Power in all its forms—military, economic and cultural—will be the focus of this course. Whether the future holds war, closed borders, huge refugee migrations, environmental degradation or pandemics, is a matter of decision making done on a global scale. International Relations is by nature an interdisciplinary field, covering, among others, game theory, geopolitics, environmental politics and trade. In this honors course students will have the chance to visit a foreign consulate in the city and hear directly from their nationals. Students will also work together with talented peers to develop a body of research on a region or issue that will form the basis for a professional quality undergraduate thesis paper. As a service learning course, there will also be the chance to work directly on an international issue.

Sociology 201 Introduction to the Study of Society(IAI# S7 900)Mon/Wed 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Prof. Sydney Hart:shart@ccc.edu

[General ed. Social Science requirement]

Everyday life feels so normal; it’s hard to see how our society shapes our opportunities and identities. Theory and research will help us explain our social world. Thinking big thoughts while paying attention to little details unveils the ways in which we live in society and society lives in us. In this course, you will explore analytic tools and paradigms to critically examine your world and make informed choices on a personal, national, and global scale. Sociology’s main contribution is that it can help you understand your own life and other people in the context of culture and broader structural opportunities and constraints. You will learn how to engage your own “sociological imagination” (concept courtesy of C. Wright Mills) and develop a new, sociological way of looking at the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in in-depth research of a topic of your choice (for example, on the representation of crime on one news station over the course of the semester; the ways that masculinity is represented in personal ads; or a story-by-story comparison of the coverage of major news events in English and Spanish newspapers) and engage with primary source reading. We will examine classical and contemporary theory in order to stimulate deep reading and discussion.

ARCHIVED – FALL 2016 HONORS COURSES

English 101 Composition I(IAI #C1900)Mon/Wed 8:00-9:20 a.m.

Prof. Vincent Bruckert:vbruckert@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communications requirement]

This class provides students with an introduction to the expectations and techniques of college writing, and it will use Malcolm Gladwell'sOutliersto discuss how we can develop successful strategies for learning and writing. The key distinction between this course plan and Prof. Bruckert’s typical use of the text for English 101 is in the focus beyond the text, including our College's Common Text and the secondary resources that inform deep readers on Gladwell's insights and research for his book. These sources can also help us determine the validity and limits of Gladwell’s arguments. Students will be expected to post their work before peer review sessions to Blackboard and review each other's work before the assigned class so that all students can peer edit together as a class.

Literature 115 Introduction to Great Books of the World(IAI# H3 907)Tues/Thurs 9:30-11:50 a.m. Prof. Michael Petersen:mpetersen@ccc.edu

[Great Books course / General ed. Humanities requirement]

In this course we will study the tradition of therevenge tragedyin literature. The genre (act of murder leads to act of retribution and death) can be traced back at least to Roman playwright Seneca (Thyestes), and it continues to popular literature and movies today. We will read William Shakespeare’sHamlet, as well asThyestes, Thomas Kyd’sThe Spanish Tragedyand Thomas Middleton’sThe Revenger’s Tragedy. Students in the course will examine this literature from multiple perspectives, deeply and critically investigating social, philosophical, cultural, historical, religious, rhetorical, and generic contexts. Students will perform close reading of primary texts in preparation for weekly student presentations, student teaching, shared inquiry, and round-table discussions. Students will research literary works and topics to produce short essays in preparation for lessons and discussion, and they will produce a long-format research paper. All students are expected to be fully engaged each class period and to demonstrate well-informed, independent thought. This course counts toward both an Honors certificate and a Great Books certificate.

Sociology 201 Introduction to the Study of Society(IAI# S7 900)Mon/Wed 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Prof. Sydney Hart:shart@ccc.edu

[General ed. Social Science requirement]

Everyday life feels sonormal; it’s hard to see how our society shapes our opportunities and identities. Theory and research will help us explain our social world. Thinking big thoughts while paying attention to little details unveils the ways in which we live in society and society lives in us. In this course, you will explore analytic tools and paradigms to critically examine your world and make informed choices on a personal, national, and global scale. Sociology’s main contribution is that it can help you understand your own life and other people in the context of culture and broader structural opportunities and constraints. You will learn how to engage your own “sociological imagination” (concept courtesy of C. Wright Mills) and develop a new, sociological way of looking at the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in in-depth research of a topic of your choice (for example, on the representation of crime on one news station over the course of the semester; the ways that masculinity is represented in personal ads; or a story-by-story comparison of the coverage of major news events in English and Spanish newspapers) and engage with primary source reading. We will examine parts of TheCommunist Manifestoby Marx and Engels, parts ofCapitalby Marx, chapters fromThe Protestant Ethicand theSpirit of Capitalismby Max Weber, “On Our Spiritual Strivings” inThe Souls of Black Folkby W.E.B. DuBois, parts of Erving Goffman’s work on impression management, deeper reading in intersectionality by Kimberle Crenshaw, and more contemporary sociological theorists of sex and gender and race and ethnicity. Professor Hart hopes that these readings will stimulate the kinds of classroom discussions that changed the way she understood the world as a first year college student. Soc 201 Honorsis a Global Studies course.

Speech 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication(IAI# C2 900)Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:50p.m. Prof. Susan Colon:scolon20@ccc.edu

[General ed. Communications requirement]

Don’t just sit there. Do something! We face numerous challenges in our local and global communities, such as social and economic inequalities and violations of basic human rights. Informally, we discuss these challenges and sometimes we complain about them. Historically, leaders from diverse backgrounds have turned talk into action by organizing meetings, rallies, strikes, and performances to achieve change and improve their –and our- lives. Thus, in this class we will explore how communication can bring about political, social, and economic change in society. We will analyze the words and behaviors of advocates and activists such as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Angela Davis, Nelson Mandela, Mother Jones, Cesar Chavez, Betty Friedan and Rachel Carson. Along the way we will also explore creative uses of visual presentations.Studying and practicing speech communication concepts and processes will help you not only develop your expressive communication skills but you’ll also begin to comprehend the various ways communication strategies such as persuasion have been used to shape your attitudes and behaviors.

  • Before registering for Honors courses, students should refer to the Honors Program requirements. 
  • Besides Honors courses, students can also consider completing Honors projects in non-Honors courses. ​​
  • For more information about the program requirements and Honors projects/contracts, go to the Honors Program homepage and see the links under "Learn More."