Navigate Up
Sign In
No
No

Center for Teaching and Learning

Fall 2020 Sessions 

Respondus Lockdown Browser

Come to this session to receive an overview of the costs/benefits regarding Respondus Lockdown Browser, as well as how to use the browser within your classroom.

Presenter: Maureen Boland, Wright Emeritus
Wednesday, September 2nd from 1:00pm-2:00pm 

  

Learn How to Bake Bread 

Baking bread provides a method of relaxation that has the added benefit of a great tasting end result. See how easy it is to bake bread when you learn a few tips that guarantee success. 

Presenter: Pamela Monaco, Dean of Instruction
Wednesday, September 16th from 2:00pm-3:00pm 

  

What Can We Do about Information Disorder? 

Misinformation and disinformation abound, clouding our access to factual content on coronavirus, social issues, and politics. Students are exhausted by cries of “fake news” and want tools to evaluate what they find. Join this session to learn more about how you can incorporate information literacy concepts into your courses. 

Presenter: Tineka Scalzo, Library Faculty
Tuesday, September 22nd from 1:00pm-2:00pm

  

What are Open Education Resources (OERs)? 

Open Educational Resources (OERs) have pros and cons. Can you save your students the costs of a textbook and switch to these free options? Could you make your own OER? Come learn more. 

Presenter: Nancy Wyss, Social Sciences Faculty
Tuesday, September 29th from 12:00pm-1:00pm 

  

How to Be an Anti-Racist Reading Group 

A roundtable discussion of chapters 1 and 3 from Ibram X. Kendi’s book, How to Be an Anti-Racist. We will consider how these ideas might help us disrupt our current pedagogy, and how these practices can be used in the classroom, as well as the campus community.

Presenter: Brendon Zatirka, English Faculty
Wednesday September 30th from 3:00pm-4:30pm

  

The Baking Powder Wars 

When baking powder was introduced in the mid-19th century, four competitors sought to control consumer loyalty to this miracle ingredient. Find out the depths the industry descended to control the rising market of well-risen cakes and cookies and breads. 

Presenter: Pamela Monaco, Dean of Instruction
Wednesday, October 7th from 3:30pm-4:30pm 

  

 Introduction to Open Educational Resources (OERs) 

For the OER novice or those who have already adopted: come share your experience and questions. This session will include a brief overview of what OERs are and why this movement toward free and open textbooks is gaining popularity among faculty, administration, and especially students. There will be time for questions and we can look together for resources if time allows. 

Presenter: Joslyn Allison, Librarian
Tuesday, October 13th from 2:00pm-3:00pm 

  

The Art of Arabic Calligraphy 

Join me for an exploration of the history of Arabic calligraphy as well as its various styles. Participants will engage in the practice of basic Arabic calligraphy skills. 

Presenter: Darlene Attiah, Biology Faculty
Monday, October 19th from 12:30pm-1:30pm

  

How to Be an Anti-Racist Reading Group 

A roundtable discussion of chapters 4 and 5 from Ibram X. Kendi’s book, How to Be an Anti-Racist. We will consider how these ideas might help us disrupt our current pedagogy, and how these practices can be used in the classroom, as well as the campus community.

Presenter: Brendon Zatirka, English Faculty
Wednesday October 28th from 3:00pm-4:30pm

  

Yeats’s Teahouse 

I will read poetry and show visual art that is part of the 3D poetry chapbook being published by Michigan State University. I can discuss writing process and process of this art book being made, as well as answer questions. 

Presenter: Patricia Connolly, Social Sciences Faculty
Thursday, October 29th from 3:00pm-4:00pm 

  

Spend a Night in Prison! Visit a Prison Museum 

Some people choose to vacation on a beach, others through an adventurous hike across England. Still others flirt with danger, choosing to visit Chernobyl or spending a night locked up in a prison. This session will talk about “dark tourism” and the increasing number of prison museums. Learn how curators balance education and entertainment as we explore the appeal of “dark tourism.” 

Presenter: Pamela Monaco, Dean of Instruction
Monday, November 2nd from 1:00pm-2:00pm 

  

 I Paid for This Research Paper and All I Got Was This Passing Grade 

Contract cheating is a billion-dollar industry, allowing students to pay someone to write their papers. To better understand the process, we bought a paper. Join this session to hear about our experience, learn more about why students cheat, and discuss ways to promote academic integrity and authentic learning. 

Presenters: Tineka Scalzo and Joslyn Allison, Librarians
Tuesday, November 10th from 2:00pm-3:00pm

  

How to Be an Anti-Racist Reading Group 

A roundtable discussion of chapters 7 and 8 from Ibram X. Kendi’s book, How to Be an Anti-Racist. We will consider how these ideas might help us disrupt our current pedagogy, and how these practices can be used in the classroom, as well as the campus community.

Presenter: Brendon Zatirka, English Faculty
Wednesday November 18th from 3:00pm-4:30pm

  

Visual Textuality: Using Images and Films to Teach Composition 

This CTL workshop will be focused on exploring and playing with the concept of “visual textuality,” and I will provide examples of and models for helping students recognize the intersections shared by imagery and text (e.g. cinema and literature) as an alternate form of teaching writing and composition and developing cultural literacy across mediums and fields of discourse. 

Presenter: Jose Luis Moctezuma, English Faculty​
Thursday, November 19th from 12:00pm-1:00pm 

Learn More

Current CTL Sessions
Fall 2020
 
Past ​CTL Sessions
Spring 2020​
Fall 2019
Spring 2019
Fall 2018 
Spring 2018​
Fall 2017​
Spring 2017​​
Fall 2016​
Spring 2016
Fall 2015​
Spring 2015
Fall 2014
Spring 2014​                                            
Fall 2013​​