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Food Service Manager

Food service managers typically do the following:
  • Interview, hire, train, oversee, and sometimes fire employees
  • Oversee the inventory and ordering of food and beverage, equipment, and supplies
  • Monitor food preparation methods, portion sizes, and the overall presentation of food
  • Comply with health and food safety standards and regulations
  • Monitor the actions of employees and patrons to ensure everyone's personal safety
  • Investigate and resolve complaints regarding food quality or service
  • Schedule staff hours and assign duties
  • Keep budgets and payroll records and review financial transactions
  • Establish standards for personnel performance and customer service
   
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Minimum Education Required for this Career

Basic Certificate
Advanced Certificate
Associate's Degree
4+ year Degree
Basic Certificate
$30,480

City Colleges Program Options

Nature of the Work

​Food service managers are responsible for the daily operations of restaurants and other establishments that prepare and serve meals and beverages to customers. Besides coordinating activities among various departments, such as kitchen, dining room, and banquet operations, food service managers ensure that customers are satisfied with their dining experience. In addition, they oversee the inventory and ordering of food, equipment, and supplies and arrange for the routine maintenance and upkeep of the restaurant's equipment and facilities. Managers are generally responsible for all administrative and human-resource functions of the business, including recruiting new employees and monitoring employee performance and training.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

​Experience in the food services industry, whether as a cook, server, or counter attendant, is the most common training for food service managers. Many restaurant and food service manager positions, particularly self-service and fast-food, are filled by promoting experienced food and beverage preparation and service workers.

Future Trends

​Food service manager jobs are expected to grow five percent, or more slowly than the average for all occupations through 2018. However, job opportunities should be good because many openings will arise from the need to replace managers who leave the occupation.

Career Pathways

Success at City Colleges