Navigate Up
Sign In
district,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalert/feed.xml;washington,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalerthw/feed.xml;truman,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalerttr/feed.xml;daley,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalertda/feed.xml;olive-harvey,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalertoh/feed.xml;kennedy,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalertkk/feed.xml;wright,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalertwr/feed.xml;malcolm-x,http://rss.blackboardconnect.com/167340/cccalertmx/feed.xml
No

Announcer

Radio and television announcers typically do the following: 

  • Present music, news, sports, the weather, the time, and commercials
  • Interview guests and moderate panels or discussions on their shows
  • Announce station programming information, such as program schedules and station breaks for commercials, or public-service information
  • Research topics for comment and discussion during shows
  • Read prepared scripts on radio or television shows
  • Comment on important news stories
  • Provide commentary for the audience during sporting events, at parades, and on other occasions
  • Select program content
  • Make promotional appearances at public or private events​
 

Minimum Education Required for this Career

Basic Certificate
Advanced Certificate
Associate's Degree
4+ year Degree
4+ Year Degree
$16,590

City Colleges Program Options

Nature of the Work

​Radio and television announcers perform a variety of tasks on and off the air. They announce station program information, such as program schedules and station breaks for commercials, or public-service information, and they introduce and close programs. Announcers read prepared scripts or make ad-lib commentary on the air as they present news, sports, the weather, the time, and commercials. If a written script is required, they may do the research and writing. Announcers also interview guests and moderate panels or discussions. Some provide commentary for the audience during sporting events, at parades, and on other occasions. Announcers often are well known to radio and television audiences and may make promotional appearances and do remote broadcasts for their stations.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

​Entry into this occupation is highly competitive, and postsecondary education or long-term on-the-job training is common. Trainees usually must have several years of experience in the industry before receiving an opportunity to work on the air. An applicant's delivery and—in television—appearance and style are important.

Future Trends

​Competition for jobs as announcers will be keen because the broadcasting field attracts many more jobseekers than there are jobs. Furthermore, employment of announcers is projected to decline slowly. In some cases, announcers leave the field because they cannot advance to better paying jobs. Changes in station ownership, format, and ratings frequently cause periods of unemployment for many announcers.

Career Pathways

Success at City Colleges